Jonanthan Cartu Reports The Week in Tax; COVID-19 related measures for tax losses a... - Jonathan Cartu CPA Accounting Firm - Tax Accountants
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Jonanthan Cartu Reports The Week in Tax; COVID-19 related measures for tax losses a…

The Week in Tax; COVID-19 related measures for tax losses a...

Jonanthan Cartu Reports The Week in Tax; COVID-19 related measures for tax losses a…


Friday was the due date for the first instalment of Provisional Tax for the year ending 31st March 2021, Provisional tax is going to be payable by anyone whose net tax for this year will exceed $5,000.

Now, in the past, we’ve covered the ability to use tax pooling to give more flexibility about payments of tax, and that’s going to be particularly important for the current tax year, given our ongoing uncertainties arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. My recommendation to clients at this moment is to adopt a conservative approach. Look at paying the first instalment of tax due today but keep watching your progress and how your turnover is going. And if matters move into a tax loss position as a downturn comes through soon, then we will take steps to mitigate or deal with the next two instalments of Provisional Tax.

But what if you know, you’ve got losses already this year and it’s not likely to get much better for the current year? Say you’re a restauranteur or you’re in the tourism business. These are two sectors are very clearly hit hard by the pandemic and the various lockdown measures.

Well, one of the measures introduced as part of the government’s response to the pandemic was the ability to carry tax losses back. Under this measure, if you have a tax loss for the 2020 or 2021 income years, you can carry those losses back one year. And the idea is that if you carried back to a profitable year this will mean you have overpaid tax in the prior year, and that tax can be released to help smooth your time through this ongoing pandemic.

And for most larger companies the tax loss carry-back regime is pretty straightforward. Carry back the loss one year, get a tax refund at 28% percent, and then you’ve got funds, which you can either use to meet other bills you may be behind on, or bring it forward and apply it against your current tax year liabilities such as GST or PAYE, depending on how dire the situation might be.

But one of the problems that’s emerged with the tax loss carry back rules affects a lot of smaller companies where their shareholder is also an employee. And under the rules that apply to these companies, these companies can pay out their profits to a shareholder-employee who is then responsible for the tax.

For example, say a company makes a profit of $100,000.  Instead of paying tax at 28% it instead distributes it as a salary to a shareholder-employee and he or she is taxed on it at their relevant marginal rates. For someone on $100,000 with no other income, that roughly works out to about $24,000. So, there’s a tax benefit to shareholder-employees because of the gradual increase in tax rates for individuals.

But the problem that’s emerged wasn’t really addressed in the current legislation. What do you do if you carry a loss back for a company with a shareholder employee? The carried back loss is not much used to that particular company because they’ve already reduced their profit to nil by distributing it to the shareholder-employee.

And by the way, I note there was a Radio New Zealand report noting that about $2 billion dollars in wage subsidies has been paid to companies that do not appear to have paid any company income tax. It’s highly likely many of those companies have shareholder employees and it is the shareholder employee who has paid the tax using the mechanism I just explained where the whole or substantial amount of the company’s profit is paid out to the shareholder-employee.

So the tax loss carry back rules don’t work too well for small micro businesses that use a shareholder-employee mechanism. And it’s something we’ll need to be looked at if there is a permanent iteration of these rules, which I believe should happen.

But it’s also why the small business sector and accountants have not looked on this particular measure with a great deal of enthusiasm yet because of those complexities about how do we deal with these tax losses that are brought back? Do you rewrite the whole position in the prior year? And then what does that do for other matters that are related to that person’s income, such as social assistance, ACC earner levies?  The amount of ACC you may claim if you have an accident is dependent on your salary as a shareholder-employee. 

So, there’s a lot of complicated issues to work through that. But the tax loss mechanism is there. It works very well for companies which don’t have shareholder-employees and individuals trading for themselves or trusts can use the loss carryback rules in either the 2020 or 2021 income years.

Converting from short-term to long-term renatl accommodation

Moving on, Airbnbs in the tourism sector will also have been hit very hard by the pandemic and the collapse in overseas tourism and the substantial decline in domestic tourism. And so, what has happened is some of these Airbnbs have reversed a trend that was developing and have moved back into providing longer term residential accommodation. 

As always, there’s a tax consequence to that and for GST purposes it means that if the GST activity is stopped, then the person is required to deregister for GST. Part of the de-registration process will mean a deemed supply of the goods that were brought into the business. You’re deemed to have sold them and pay GST output tax on the way out. And if you’ve claimed a big input tax credit for, say, a whole property, moving it over to Airbnb, that means that you could have a substantial output tax payable on deregistration, as it’s done at a market value.

Now, under the GST Act, there is a provision that where someone is no longer carrying on a taxable activity they are obliged to let the Commissioner of Inland Revenue know within 21 days of their taxable activity ceasing and then that registration must be cancelled unless there are reasonable grounds to think the taxable activity will be carried on within 12 months. So, this could apply if you think that within 12 months-time, we could be back up and running again.

What Inland Revenue has done is extended this twelve-month period to 18 months through a special COVID-19 determination which has just been issued and this will apply until 30th of September, 2021. So you now have 18 months, a lot more flexibility about whether you’re going to resume your Airbnb activities or drop out of the picture completely.

Just a caveat, though, that if you are currently using a property for residential accommodation, but you anticipate going back to making taxable supplies in Airbnb, you have to do what’s called a change in use calculation.  This is basically an apportionment of the value of the property brought into the GST net over the expected time it’s being used for taxable activities. A little bit complicated, but you produce one of those calculations as part of your GST returns.

Political tax policy

Now, yesterday, National released its small business tax policy.  In terms of tax rates it…

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